Welcome to North Canyon Medical Center

North Canyon Medical Center embraces patient-first values in serving our neighbors in the Magic Valley. We want to ensure that our patients can stay close to home without forfeiting the quality of medical care, so we are committed to providing levels of professionalism, advanced medical technology, and patient comfort that are without equal.

We are a small, rural medical center. The people we serve are our families, friends and neighbors. We want to ensure that our patients can stay close to home without sacrificing the quality of medical care. Our size should not limit their access to the finest health care available, and we are passionately committed to providing levels of professionalism, advanced medical technology, and patient comfort that are without equal.

Although we may be the closest medical center for those we serve, we make certain no one is sacrificing quality for the sake of convenience. Patients at North Canyon receive the medical care they need and deserve. In addition to our wide range of medical offerings, we have a relationship with the Mayo Clinic that allows us to take advantage of the talent, expertise and support of one of the world’s finest medical resources.

We are in a constant state of improvement. We want the experience for everyone who interacts with North Canyon Medical Center to be positive. Whether they’re patients, visitors, vendors, medical professionals, administrators, support staff, or volunteers, we strive to ensure they feel valued.

We endeavor to perform with integrity, compassion, and fairness; continuing to earn the respect of the communities we serve, while nurturing our reputation as a cherished resource and source of pride for all.

Board of Directors

Comprised of community members and executives from NCMC responsible to oversee operations.

Executive Council

The Executive Council are key stakeholders at North Canyon Medical Center.

Our History

Originally founded in 1918, North Canyon Medical Center (NCMC) is located in Gooding, Idaho.

1918 – 1970

When the hospital originally opened in 1918, it did so under the complexities of the Pandemic Spanish Flu. At that time, Gooding was a small, western community suffering from the ravages of the Pandemic and the opening of a hospital was a welcome site. The hospital, originally named Gooding Hospital, cost $16,000 to construct and offered 16 patient rooms.

At the time of the opening in November 1918, only one floor of the 3-story building was complete. The early opening was not planned but became a necessity as the number of sick residents reached an all time high and there was no other hospital nearby to care for them. So, officials made the decision to open one floor of the hospital to treat influenza patients while workers completed the remaining levels.

Throughout the first 50 years, the hospital had changes in ownership, changes in funding including money generated from slot machines in town and underwent structural adjustments to accommodate changes in healthcare and the growing community.

The original facility was in operation until 1970 when it closed, and healthcare services moved to the new location on Montana Street. The original structure stood until 1975 when it was demolished to make way for new businesses.

1970 – 2010

In November 1970, about 800 community members braved the wintery cold weather for the dedication of the new hospital, named Gooding County Memorial Hospital. The new hospital cost approximately $800,000 and was mostly funded by a taxpayer bond of $550,000 that passed with a landslide majority vote. The remaining money came from Hill-Burton Funding.

The hospital on Montana Street served the community for 40 years and was closed in March 2010 when the new state-of-the-art hospital, North Canyon Medical Center, opened at the south end of town. The Montana Street location still exists today and is privately owned but does not offer healthcare services.

2010 – Current

In March 2010, the new hospital, North Canyon Medical Center opened to the public and the structure on Montana Street officially closed.